Matt RaibleMatt Raible is a Java Champion and Developer Advocate at Okta. developer.okta.com

The JHipster Mini-Book The JHipster Mini-Book is a guide to getting started with hip technologies today: Angular, Bootstrap, and Spring Boot. All of these frameworks are wrapped up in an easy-to-use project called JHipster.

This book shows you how to build an app with JHipster, and guides you through the plethora of tools, techniques and options you can use. Furthermore, it explains the UI and API building blocks so you understand the underpinnings of your great application.

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10+ YEARS


Over 10 years ago, I wrote my first blog post. Since then, I've authored books, had kids, traveled the world, found Trish and blogged about it all.

How do you get started in programming?

I recently received the email below from someone asking how he might get started in programming. I think this is a popular topic, especially given the current economic situation in the US (unemployment is high, but not in the tech industry). For that reason, I figured I'd post my response here and allow others to chime in with their advice.

I read about you on LinkedIn, forgive my intrusion. Since you seem like an expert in the field of designing websites I wanted to know your thoughts on switching into this field late in life. I am 41 and looking to make the move from an unrelated field (finance) to programming. So far I have learned HTML, CSS and some Javascript. I have taken classes on C and Java. I have made some basic Android phone apps.

What languages do you think I should focus on? What is the fastest way to get up to speed to make a career of it? Classes? Take a entry level job? Study on my own?

Thanks for any insights….

My reply:

It's interesting that you're switching from finance to programming. I did the same thing early on in my career, but I was fortunate enough to do it in college (I have degrees in Russian, International Business and Finance) and therefore able to audit some CS classes before I graduated.

I think the most valuable skills these days are front-end skills (HTML, CSS and JavaScript). If you can combine those skills with the ability to design websites, you'll go along way. I've taken a different approach where I have excellent front-end skills, but also know a lot about the backend.

While it helps to have a Java background these days, the real sweat spot is the JVM and the containers that run on it like Tomcat and Jetty. A lot of Java developers are learning Groovy and Scala, but unfortunately a lot of their documentation/books are targeted towards Java developers.

The fastest way to get up-to-speed on it is to start your own project (if you can't get a company to hire you to do it). I'd suggest creating a webapp that solves a problem that you have, makes your life easier, etc. If you open source it and build a community around it, that's just as good as working for a company as far as experience goes. Combine this with studying on your own and you can likely come up to speed very quickly.

As a programmer, what advice do you have for someone looking to switch careers, or get into our industry fresh out of college?

Posted in Java at Jul 28 2011, 11:12:09 AM MDT 8 Comments

Another Dream Realized: Mountain Views

A few years back, I developed a few 5-year goals. The first was to build a sauna in my basement, the second was to get a condo in the mountains and the third was to restore my old '66 21-window VW Bus. I finished the sauna earlier this year and I'm proud to say my 2nd goal has been achieved as of last week.

Views from Waterside West in Fraser, CO

As far as the last one, that's still a work in progress. If not this year, hopefully I'll be driving the bus around next spring. In the meantime, it's gonna be one helluva ski season. ;-)

Posted in General at Jul 28 2011, 05:33:21 AM MDT 4 Comments