Matt RaibleMatt Raible is a Java Champion and Developer Advocate at Okta. developer.okta.com

The JHipster Mini-Book The JHipster Mini-Book is a guide to getting started with hip technologies today: AngularJS, Bootstrap, and Spring Boot. All of these frameworks are wrapped up in an easy-to-use project called JHipster.

This book shows you how to build an app with JHipster, and guides you through the plethora of tools, techniques and options you can use. Furthermore, it explains the UI and API building blocks so you understand the underpinnings of your great application.

For book updates, follow @jhipster-book on Twitter.

10+ YEARS


Over 10 years ago, I wrote my first blog post. Since then, I've authored books, had kids, traveled the world, found Trish and blogged about it all.

Google's Mirror of Maven Central 25% Faster

Last week, Takari announced that Google is Maven Central's New Best Friend. While writing a news article about this for InfoQ, I decided to run a small test to see the speed of the default Maven Central versus the new Google Cloud Storage instance. This micro benchmark didn't seem worthy of including in the article, but I think it's interesting to see the speed improvements I found.

I ran rm -rf ~/.m2/repository, then mvn install with the default repository configured. I ran the commands again with Google Cloud Storage. I found that the downloading of dependencies, compilation and running unit tests on AppFuse's web projects averaged 4 minutes, 30 seconds. With Google Cloud Storage, the same process averaged 3 minutes and 37 seconds. By my calculations, this means you speed up artifact resolution for your Maven projects by 25% by switching to Google. To do that, create a ~/.m2/settings.xml file with the following contents.

<settings>
  <mirrors>
    <mirror>
      <id>google-maven-central</id>
      <name>Google Maven Central</name>
      <url>https://maven-central.storage.googleapis.com</url>
      <mirrorOf>central</mirrorOf>
    </mirror>
  </mirrors>
</settings>

Benchmark Details
My tests were run on a Mac Pro (late 2013) with a 3.5 GHz 6-Core Intel Xeon E5 processor and 32 GB of RAM. Bandwidth speeds during this test averaged 57 Mbps down, 6 Mbps up. Below are the timing numbers (in minutes) from my test:

Default: 4:33, 4:36, 4:32, 4:24, 4:09
Google: 5:13, 3:35, 2:15, 3:38, 3:39

Google had some wide variances in its results, with five minutes and two minutes. Because of this, I dropped the low and high numbers for each service before calculating the average. My math with raw numbers is below.

Default:
273, 276, 272, 264, 213 = 260, 4:20
276, 272, 264 = 270, 4:30

Google:
313, 215, 135, 218, 219 = 220, 3.66 = 3:40
215, 218, 219 = 3:37

Chen Eric commented on the InfoQ article to note that Chinese programmers are blocked from using Google.

Update: Jason Swank of Sonatype has done some more extensive benchmarking and found different results.

We found that average unprimed Google API (first mvn run) caching performed 30% slower than Maven Central. Primed Google API cache performance (second run) was 3% faster then Maven Central (second run). We also ran a number of cloud-based tests with similar results.

Posted in Java at Nov 10 2015, 12:13:51 AM MST 4 Comments