Matt RaibleMatt Raible is a Java Champion and Developer Advocate at Okta. developer.okta.com

The JHipster Mini-Book The JHipster Mini-Book is a guide to getting started with hip technologies today: Angular, Bootstrap, and Spring Boot. All of these frameworks are wrapped up in an easy-to-use project called JHipster.

This book shows you how to build an app with JHipster, and guides you through the plethora of tools, techniques and options you can use. Furthermore, it explains the UI and API building blocks so you understand the underpinnings of your great application.

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10+ YEARS


Over 10 years ago, I wrote my first blog post. Since then, I've authored books, had kids, traveled the world, found Trish and blogged about it all.

Developing with AngularJS - Part III: Services

This is the 3rd article in a series on my experience developing with AngularJS. I used AngularJS for several months to create a "My Dashboard" feature for a client and learned a whole bunch of Angular goodness along the way. For previous articles, please see Part I: The Basics and Part II: Dialogs and Data.

Angular offers several ways to interact with data from the server. The easiest way is to use the $resource factory, which lets you interact with RESTful server-side data sources. When we started the My Dashboard project, we were hoping to interact with a REST API, but soon found out that it didn't have all the data we needed. Rather than loading the page and then making another request to get its data, we decided to embed the JSON in the page. For communication back to the server, we used our tried-and-true Ajax solution: DWR.

In Angular-speak, services are singletons that carry out specific tasks common to web apps. In other words, they're any $name object that can be injected into a controller or directive. However, as a Java Developer, I tend to think of services as objects that communicate with the server. Angular's documentation on Creating Services shows you various options for registering services. I used the angular.Module api method.

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Posted in The Web at Jun 25 2013, 07:03:26 AM MDT 10 Comments

Developing with AngularJS - Part II: Dialogs and Data

A couple of days ago, I wrote an article on how I started developing with AngularJS. I used AngularJS for several months to develop a "My Dashboard" feature for a client's product and learned a whole bunch of stuff along the way.

This article provides an overview of how I changed some of My Dashboard's features to use Angular instead of jQuery. After finishing the prototype work in January, we started moving bits and pieces into the main application. We kept the same file names for our Angular-related files and copied them into the project.

Directory Structure

All these files are packaged up into a dashboard.js file that's included at the bottom of our Dashboard page. While our prototype used jQuery 1.9 and jQuery UI 1.10, the application's codebase used jQuery 1.7.1 and jQuery UI 1.8.3. Luckily, this didn't present a problem as everything continued to work as expected.

Around this time, we also had many discussions with the Product Team about charts. Since Highcharts required we purchase a license, we took at look at AnyChart, which we were already using. We were able to get AnyChart to work with our existing chart directive with minimal changes. Most changes were in the JSON itself.

We committed the first pass (with sample data still hard-coded) in mid-February.

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Posted in The Web at Jun 20 2013, 08:45:13 AM MDT 4 Comments

Developing with AngularJS - Part I: The Basics

There's many, many different introductions to AngularJS available on the internet. This article is not another introduction, but rather a story about my learning experience. It all started way back in January of this year. I was working as a UI Architecture Consultant at Taleo/Oracle, my client for the last 21 months. My gig there ended last month, but they agreed to let me publish a series of articles about the knowledge I gained.

Project Background

The Director of Product Management had been working on the concepts for a new project - codenamed "Visual MyView". Below is a mockup he created for our kickoff meeting on January 4th.

My Dashboard - Original Mockup

From his original email about the above mockup:

The intent here is that one of the columns has rows that have a similar width. The rows could be dragged and dropped into a different order – or potentially the two columns could also be reordered. The rows will basically be comprised of similar widgets. You can see in the mockup how the first two rows might look – and sample widgets. The widgets shown can be configured by the end user, as well as the order in which they are displayed. Other requirements given to us were the following.

  • Row 1 is comprised of 'summary' widgets that are 'todo' items. Reviews needing done – approvals required – etc.
  • Row 2 will be a graph row – having graphs and charts to display information – larger squares will build this row.
  • Row 3's content was not determined yet.

I started the initial layout with static HTML and CSS and had a wireframe to show by mid January.

Wireframe

By the end of January, we'd renamed the project to My Dashboard and had a working prototype using CoolClock and moment.js for the clock in the top right, AngularJS to display widget data, jQuery UI for drag-n-drop of rows and widgets, Bootstrap's Carousel for holding charts and Highcharts for rendering charts.

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Posted in The Web at Jun 18 2013, 09:06:52 AM MDT 9 Comments