Matt RaibleMatt Raible is a Java Champion and Developer Advocate at Okta. developer.okta.com

The JHipster Mini-Book The JHipster Mini-Book is a guide to getting started with hip technologies today: Angular, Bootstrap, and Spring Boot. All of these frameworks are wrapped up in an easy-to-use project called JHipster.

This book shows you how to build an app with JHipster, and guides you through the plethora of tools, techniques and options you can use. Furthermore, it explains the UI and API building blocks so you understand the underpinnings of your great application.

For book updates, follow @jhipster-book on Twitter.

10+ YEARS


Over 10 years ago, I wrote my first blog post. Since then, I've authored books, had kids, traveled the world, found Trish and blogged about it all.

Enhancing your GWT Application with the UrlRewriteFilter

Last week, I spent some time trying to change the location of my cache/nocache HTML files in my GWT project. I started the project with the gwt-maven-plugin's archetype. The message I posted to the gwt-maven Google Group is below.

Rather than having my application's HTML file in src/main/java/com/mycompany/Application.html, I'd like to move it to src/main/webapp/index.html. I tried copying the HTML and adding the following to my index.html, but no dice:

<meta name="gwt:module" content="com.mycompany.Application"/>

Is this possible with the gwt-maven-plugin? I'd like to have my main HTML and CSS at the root of my application.

The good news is I figured out a solution using the UrlRewriteFilter that 1) allows hosted mode to work as usual and 2) allows your app to be served up from the root URL (/ instead of /com.company.Module/Application.html). Here's the urlrewrite.xml that makes it all possible.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCENGINE urlrewrite PUBLIC "-//tuckey.org//DTD UrlRewrite 3.0//EN"
        "http://tuckey.org/res/dtds/urlrewrite3.0.dtd">

<urlrewrite>
    <rule>
        <from>^/$</from>
        <to type="forward" last="true">/com.mycompany.app.Application/Application.html</to>
    </rule>
    <rule>
        <from>/index.html</from>
        <to type="forward" last="true">/com.mycompany.app.Application/Application.html</to>
    </rule>
    <-- This last rule is necessary for JS and CSS files -->
    <rule>
        <from>^/(.*)\.(.*)$</from>
        <to type="forward">/com.mycompany.app.Application/$1.$2</to>
    </rule>
</urlrewrite>

If you're using the gwt-maven plugin, this file goes in src/main/webapp/WEB-INF. In addition, you'll need to add the following to your web.xml.

    <filter>
        <filter-name>rewriteFilter</filter-name>
        <filter-class>org.tuckey.web.filters.urlrewrite.UrlRewriteFilter</filter-class>
    </filter>

    <filter-mapping>
        <filter-name>rewriteFilter</filter-name>
        <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
    </filter-mapping>

Finally, add the UrlRewriteFilter dependency in your pom.xml:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.tuckey</groupId>
        <artifactId>urlrewritefilter</artifactId>
        <version>3.1.0</version>
    </dependency>

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Update: Jeff posted an alternative configuration that allows you to eliminate the last rule in urlrewrite.xml, as well as use the beloved mvn jetty:run command. To use cleaner WAR packaging and the Jetty plugin, add the following to your pom.xml:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
        <webappDirectory>
            ${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}/com.mycompany.app.Application
        </webappDirectory>
    </configuration>
</plugin>
<plugin>
    <groupId>org.mortbay.jetty</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jetty-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>6.1.14</version>
    <configuration>
        <webAppConfig>
            <contextPath>/</contextPath>
            <baseResource implementation="org.mortbay.resource.ResourceCollection">
                <resourcesAsCSV>
                    ${basedir}/src/main/webapp,
                    ${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}/com.mycompany.app.Application
                </resourcesAsCSV>
            </baseResource>
        </webAppConfig>
        <scanIntervalSeconds>3</scanIntervalSeconds>
        <scanTargets>
            <scanTarget>${basedir}/src/main/resources</scanTarget>
            <scanTarget>${basedir}/src/main/webapp/WEB-INF</scanTarget>
            <scanTarget>
                ${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}/com.mycompany.app.Application
            </scanTarget>
        </scanTargets>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

Then you can trim your urlrewrite.xml down to:

<urlrewrite>
    <rule>
        <from>^/$</from>
        <to type="forward" last="true">/Application.html</to>
    </rule>
    <rule>
        <from>/index.html</from>
        <to type="forward" last="true">/Application.html</to>
    </rule>
</urlrewrite>

Of course, you could also change the welcome-file in your web.xml or use index.html and the <meta http-equiv="REFRESH"> option. Personally, I have so much affection for the UrlRewriteFilter that I like having it in my project. I'm sure I'll need it someday.

Thanks Jeff!

Posted in Java at Feb 23 2009, 05:02:29 PM MST 13 Comments

Comparing Web Frameworks Book

A publisher recently sent me an e-mail asking some advice. They received a proposal for a book that compares CakePHP, Symfony, Zend, TurboGears, Django, Struts, RoR. Here's a quote from the proposal:

We would like to compare a couple of frameworks and present their advantages and disadvantages in various applications.

Obviously, that kind of manual would be very useful for readers who are starting their 'adventures' with web applications, as it would facilitate their choosing the best framework for their particular application. The manuscript would offer a comparison of the most popular solutions (CakePHP, Symfony, Zend Framework, TurboGears, Django, Struts, Ruby on Rails) and demonstrate the main differences between each.

Therefore, the target audience would mainly be project managers, responsible for deciding on the technologies to be used for in-house projects, as well as less experienced, web application beginners.

Another purpose of the book would be to present 'good practices' in various frameworks, such as code re-factoring, design patterns and application security. From this point of view, it could become a valuable asset for experienced and learner programmers alike.

Since I got a lot of feedback from my tweet on this subject, I figured I'd ask it here.

What do you think of such a book?

Here's my response:

How do PHP books do these days? Of the list of frameworks (CakePHP, Symfony, Zend Framework, TurboGears, Django, Struts, Ruby on Rails), I think there's interest in Django and Rails, but not so much the others. And Struts sucks, so having that as a comparison is obviously going to make it look bad. I wouldn't buy it, but I'm a Java guy that's mostly interested in web frameworks that make developing SOFEA-based applications easier. In my mind, these are Flex and GWT.

The book I'd like to see would cover developing RESTful backends and SOFEA front-ends. RoR, Grails or Django could be used to develop the backend and Flex, GWT and X could be for the front-end. In reality, this is probably a tough book to write b/c things move so fast. If you decide to do it, I'd keep it short and sweet so you can get it to market and update it quickly.

Posted in Java at Feb 23 2009, 09:49:15 AM MST 17 Comments