Matt RaibleMatt Raible is a Java Champion and Developer Advocate at Okta. developer.okta.com

The JHipster Mini-Book The JHipster Mini-Book is a guide to getting started with hip technologies today: Angular, Bootstrap, and Spring Boot. All of these frameworks are wrapped up in an easy-to-use project called JHipster.

This book shows you how to build an app with JHipster, and guides you through the plethora of tools, techniques and options you can use. Furthermore, it explains the UI and API building blocks so you understand the underpinnings of your great application.

For book updates, follow @jhipster-book on Twitter.

10+ YEARS


Over 10 years ago, I wrote my first blog post. Since then, I've authored books, had kids, traveled the world, found Trish and blogged about it all.
You searched this site for "jQuery". 63 entries found.

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Best Practices for using Foundation with AngularJS Revisited

Angular Foundation A couple weeks ago I wrote about using Foundation with AngularJS. Based on research I'd done, I concluded that it was best to use Foundation for Apps for any webapps my client created and Foundation for Sites for any websites (e.g. a WordPress-based intranet).

After doing my initial research, I did some prototyping with Foundation for Apps (F4A). What I discovered is that F4A does not include all the same components as Foundation for Sites (F5). For example, the top-bar and dropdown functionality are missing. I posted my issues to the Foundation Forums.

The response I received:

It should work. You would need to copy over all the Scss and global mixins that you used in top-bar or at least all the output CSS from it. Otherwise there is no reason the components won't fit into the grid.

I was able to import Foundation for Sites into my project by adding it to bower.json:

  "dependencies": {
    "foundation-apps": "~1.0.2",
    "foundation": "~5.5.1"
  }

After doing this, I added the new path to Gulpfile.js:

var sassPaths = [
  'client/assets/scss',
  'bower_components/foundation/scss',
  'bower_components/foundation-apps/scss'
];

After making this change, the top-bar rendered and my dropdowns worked. Since there was no jQuery in the page, I thought this might be a viable option. However, Jason Demitri quickly pointed out it probably wouldn't work with mobile. He was right.

While using F4A, I noticed that its components, and much of its look-n-feel, was different than F5. If you look at its Email App template, you'll see it looks kinda like a mobile app, even in a desktop browser. After trying F4A myself, I decided that F4A wasn't for us. First of all, it doesn't seem to provide a consistent look and feel with a website that's written using F5. Furthermore, F4A only supports IE10+. In the healthcare industry, there's a lot of older browsers out there, so my client needs to support IE9 as a minimum.

For these reasons, I decided to try Angular directives for Foundation. I took a prototype I'd written with F5, removed its JavaScript, added Angular Foundation + Foundation dependencies to bower.json, added references to the respective scripts in index.html and added 'mm.foundation' as a dependency in app.js. The experiment worked beautifully and I was quite happy with the results. I shared my findings with the team and we decided Angular Foundation is the best way to integrate Foundation and AngularJS.

F4A is pretty new and I imagine it'll add more of F5's features as it evolves. However, I don't know if the two will ever be so similar that they can live side-by-side and allow a seamless experience for users. If you're interested in mixing F4A and F5, you might want to watch Jason Demitri's foundationUltra. This project combines Angular Foundation, Foundation for Sites, Foundation for Apps and Font Awesome. You can see a demo at http://relutiondev.github.io/foundationUltra/.

Posted in The Web at Feb 19 2015, 09:38:42 AM MST 1 Comment

Getting Started with AngularJS

I was hired by my current client in November to help them choose a technology stack for developing modern web applications. In our first sprint, we decided to look at JavaScript MVC frameworks. I suggested AngularJS, Ember.js and React. Since most of the team was new to JavaScript MVC, I decided to create a tutorial for them. I tried to make it easy so they could learn how to write a simple web application with AngularJS. I thought others could benefit from this article as well, so I asked (and received) permission from my client to publish it here.

What you'll build

You'll build a simple web application with AngularJS. You'll also add search and edit features with mock data.

What you'll need

  • About 15-30 minutes
  • A favorite text editor or IDE. I recommend IntelliJ IDEA.
  • Git installed.
  • Node.js and NPM installed.
[Read More]

Posted in The Web at Jan 29 2015, 11:12:38 AM MST Add a Comment

AppFuse, Reduced

In November, I had some time off between clients. To occupy my time, I exercised my body and brain a bit. I spent a couple hours a day exercising and a few hours a day working on AppFuse. AppFuse isn't used to start projects nearly as much as it once was. This makes sense since there's been a ton of innovation on the JVM and there's lots of get-started-quickly frameworks now. Among my favorites are Spring Boot, JHipster, Grails and Play.

You can see that AppFuse's community activity has decreased quite a bit over the years by looking at its mailing list traffic.

AppFuse Mailing List Traffic, December 2014

Even though there's not a lot of users talking on the mailing list, it still seems to get quite a few downloads from Maven Central.

AppFuse Maven Central Stats, November 2014

I think the biggest value that AppFuse provides now is a learning tool for those who work on it. Also, it's a good place to show other developers how they can evolve with open source frameworks (e.g. Spring, Hibernate, JSF, Tapestry, Struts) over several years. Showing how we migrated to Spring MVC Test, for example, might be useful. The upcoming move to Spring Data instead of our Generic DAO solution might be interesting as well.

Regardless of whether AppFuse is used a lot or not, it should be easy to maintain. Over the several weeks, I made some opinionated changes and achieved some pretty good progress on simplifying things and making the project easier to maintain. The previous structure has a lot of duplicate versions, properties and plugin configurations between different projects. I was able to leverage Maven's inheritance model to make a number of improvements:

[Read More]

Posted in Java at Dec 16 2014, 06:03:31 AM MST 6 Comments

Developing an iOS Native App with Ionic

In my current project, I've been helping a client develop a native iOS app for their customers. It's written mostly in Objective-C and talks to a REST API. I talked about how we documented our REST API a couple days ago. We developed a prototype for this application back in December, using AngularJS and Bootstrap. Rather than using PhoneGap, we loaded our app in a UIWebView.

It all seemed to work well until we needed to read an activation code with the device's camera. Since we didn't know how to do OCR in JavaScript, we figured a mostly-native app was the way to go. We hired an outside company to do iOS development in January and they've been developing the app since the beginning of February. In the last couple weeks, we encountered some screens that seemed fitting for HTML5, so we turned back to our AngularJS prototype.

The prototype used Bootstrap heavily, but we quickly learned it didn't look like an iOS 7 app, which is what our UX Designer requested. A co-worker pointed out Ionic, developed by Drifty. It's basically Bootstrap for Native, so the apps you develop look and behave like a mobile application.

What is Ionic?
Free and open source, Ionic offers a library of mobile-optimized HTML, CSS and JS components for building highly interactive apps. Built with Sass and optimized for AngularJS.

I started developing with Ionic a few weeks ago. Using its CSS classes and AngularJS directives, I was able to create several new screens in a matter of days. Most of the time, I was learning new things: how to override its back button behavior (to launch back into the native app), how to configure routes with ui-router, and how to make the $ionicLoading service look native. Now that I know a lot of the basics, I feel like I can really crank out some code.

Tip: I learned how subviews work with ui-router thanks to a YouTube video of Tim Kindberg on Angular UI-Router. However, subviews never fully made sense until I saw Jared Bell's diagram.

To demonstrate how easy it is to use Ionic, I whipped up a quick example application. You can get the source on GitHub at https://github.com/mraible/boot-ionic. The app is a refactored version of Josh Long's x-auth-security that uses Ionic instead of raw AngularJS and Bootstrap. To keep things simple, I did not develop the native app that wraps the HTML.

[Read More]

Posted in The Web at Mar 27 2014, 04:38:55 PM MDT 9 Comments

Using Grunt with AngularJS for Front End Optimization

I'm passionate about front end optimization and have been for years. My original inspiration was Steve Souders and his Even Faster Web Sites talk at OSCON 2008. Since then, I've optimized this blog, made it even faster with a new design, doubled the speed of several apps for clients and showed how to make AppFuse faster. As part of my Devoxx 2013 presentation, I showed how to do page speed optimization in a Java webapp.

I developed a couple AngularJS apps last year. To concat and minify their stylesheets and scripts, I used mechanisms that already existed in the projects. On one project, it was Ant and its concat task. On the other, it was part of a Grails application, so I used the resources and yui-minify-resources plugins.

The Angular project I'm working on now will be published on a web server, as well as bundled in an iOS native app. Therefore, I turned to Grunt to do the optimization this time. I found it to be quite simple, once I figured out how to make it work with Angular. Based on my findings, I submitted a pull request to add Grunt to angular-seed.

Below are the steps I used to add Grunt to my Angular project.

[Read More]

Posted in The Web at Jan 15 2014, 12:15:52 PM MST 7 Comments

Developing with AngularJS - Part IV: Making it Pop

Welcome to the final article in a series on my experience developing with AngularJS. I learned its concepts, beat my head against-the-wall with and finally tamed it enough to create a "My Dashboard" feature for a client. For previous articles, please see the following:

The last mile of development for the My Dashboard feature was to spice things up a bit and make it look better. We hired a design company to come up a new look and feel and they went to work. Within a week, we had a meeting with them and they presented a few different options. We picked the one we liked the best and went to work. Below are screenshots that I used to implement the new design.

My Dashboard - New Design My Dashboard with Show More

[Read More]

Posted in The Web at Sep 12 2013, 10:54:29 AM MDT 7 Comments

Developing with AngularJS - Part II: Dialogs and Data

A couple of days ago, I wrote an article on how I started developing with AngularJS. I used AngularJS for several months to develop a "My Dashboard" feature for a client's product and learned a whole bunch of stuff along the way.

This article provides an overview of how I changed some of My Dashboard's features to use Angular instead of jQuery. After finishing the prototype work in January, we started moving bits and pieces into the main application. We kept the same file names for our Angular-related files and copied them into the project.

Directory Structure

All these files are packaged up into a dashboard.js file that's included at the bottom of our Dashboard page. While our prototype used jQuery 1.9 and jQuery UI 1.10, the application's codebase used jQuery 1.7.1 and jQuery UI 1.8.3. Luckily, this didn't present a problem as everything continued to work as expected.

Around this time, we also had many discussions with the Product Team about charts. Since Highcharts required we purchase a license, we took at look at AnyChart, which we were already using. We were able to get AnyChart to work with our existing chart directive with minimal changes. Most changes were in the JSON itself.

We committed the first pass (with sample data still hard-coded) in mid-February.

[Read More]

Posted in The Web at Jun 20 2013, 08:45:13 AM MDT 4 Comments

Developing with AngularJS - Part I: The Basics

There's many, many different introductions to AngularJS available on the internet. This article is not another introduction, but rather a story about my learning experience. It all started way back in January of this year. I was working as a UI Architecture Consultant at Taleo/Oracle, my client for the last 21 months. My gig there ended last month, but they agreed to let me publish a series of articles about the knowledge I gained.

Project Background

The Director of Product Management had been working on the concepts for a new project - codenamed "Visual MyView". Below is a mockup he created for our kickoff meeting on January 4th.

My Dashboard - Original Mockup

From his original email about the above mockup:

The intent here is that one of the columns has rows that have a similar width. The rows could be dragged and dropped into a different order – or potentially the two columns could also be reordered. The rows will basically be comprised of similar widgets. You can see in the mockup how the first two rows might look – and sample widgets. The widgets shown can be configured by the end user, as well as the order in which they are displayed. Other requirements given to us were the following.

  • Row 1 is comprised of 'summary' widgets that are 'todo' items. Reviews needing done – approvals required – etc.
  • Row 2 will be a graph row – having graphs and charts to display information – larger squares will build this row.
  • Row 3's content was not determined yet.

I started the initial layout with static HTML and CSS and had a wireframe to show by mid January.

Wireframe

By the end of January, we'd renamed the project to My Dashboard and had a working prototype using CoolClock and moment.js for the clock in the top right, AngularJS to display widget data, jQuery UI for drag-n-drop of rows and widgets, Bootstrap's Carousel for holding charts and Highcharts for rendering charts.

[Read More]

Posted in The Web at Jun 18 2013, 09:06:52 AM MDT 9 Comments

Happy 10 Year AppFuse!

10 years ago yesterday, I released the first version of AppFuse. It started with XDoclet generating ActionForms from POJOs and became very popular for Struts developers that wanted to use Hibernate. The project's popularity peaked in 2006, as you can see from the mailing list traffic below.

AppFuse Mailing List Traffic

It's possible the decrease in traffic is because we re-wrote everything to be based on Maven. It's also possible it was because of more attractive full-stack frameworks like Grails and Rails. However, the real reason is likely that I stopped working on it all the time due to getting a divorce becoming an awesome dad.

Below is a timeline of how the project evolved over its first 4 years.

AppFuse History: 2003 - 2007

AppFuse has been a great project for me to work on and it's been a large source of my knowledge about Java, Web Frameworks, Spring, Hibernate - as well as build systems like Ant and Maven. We started with CVS, moved to SVN and now we're on GitHub. We've experienced migrating from Tapestry 4 to Tapestry 5 (thanks Serge Eby!), upgrading to JSF 2 and enjoyed the backwards compatibility of Spring and Struts 2 throughout the years. We've also added REST support, a Web Services archetype and kept up with the latest Spring and Hibernate releases.

AppFuse History: 2007 - 2013

Last year, we added Bootstrap and jQuery as foundational front-end frameworks. For our next release, we're switching to PrimeFaces, adding Wicket and changing from jMock to Mockito. Most of these changes are already in source control, we just need to polish them up a bit and add AMP support. I hope to release 3.0 before the bus is done. ;)

Thanks to all the enthusiastic users of and contributors to AppFuse over the years. It's been a great ride!

Posted in Java at Apr 05 2013, 08:56:45 AM MDT 3 Comments

The Modern Java Web Developer and Java Web Security at Denver JUG

Last night, I had the pleasure of delivering two talks at the Denver Java User Group. The first talk, The Modern Java Web Developer, was inspired by the book titled The Well-Grounded Java Developer. Ben Evans and Martijn Verburg mention in the beginning of the book that they wrote it as a training guide to get new Java developers up to speed. For my talk, I wanted to do something similar, but for Java Web Developers.

I mentioned that the first thing you have to do to become modern is to change your title from a Java Web Developer to a JVM Web Developer. After doing that, you have a whole slew of new and wonderful technologies at your disposal. From there, I believe the Modern JVM Web Developer:

  • Starts with Fast Hardware
  • Uses IntelliJ IDEA
  • Leverages jQuery, HTML5, and CSS3
  • Creates High Performance Web Sites
  • For Mobile Devices
  • In the Cloud
  • And cares about Security

You can also view this presentation on Slideshare or download it from my presentations page.

The second talk was on Java Web Application Security and was largely an updated version of the talk I gave a couple years ago, starting with an appearance at the Utah JUG. It was mostly a live demo session using my Ajax Login application. To prepare the project for this talk, I created branches for each step. This means you can checkout the "baseline" branch and use Git to compare it with the "javaee" branch. You can also compare the "spring-security" branch vs. the "apache-shiro" branch. Finally, you could see what I needed to do to fix many of the vulnerabilities found by Zed Attack Proxy.

You can also view this presentation on Slideshare or download it from my presentations page.

Thanks to the DJUG and Thrive folks for providing good beer (especially the Guinness!) and FullContact for hosting. Also, I'd like to thank Manning for the copies of The Well-Grounded Java Developer they sent and No Starch Press for copies of Michal Zalewsky's The Tangled Web: A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications. Last, but certainly not least, thanks to all the good people who attended and listened to me ramble on about all this cool technology.

Future speaking engagements include Devoxx France in March and Denver's HTML5 User Group in April.

Posted in Java at Feb 14 2013, 10:23:18 AM MST 2 Comments