Matt RaibleMatt Raible is a Web Architecture Consultant specializing in open source frameworks.

10+ YEARS


Over 10 years ago, I wrote my first blog post. Since then, I've authored books, had kids, traveled the world, found Trish and blogged about it all.

Switching AppFuse from MyFaces to PrimeFaces

When describing my bias against JSF back in November, I wrote:

... there's a lot of folks praising JSF 2 (and PrimeFaces moreso). That's why I'll be integrating it (or merging your pull request) into the 2.3 release of AppFuse. Since PrimeFaces contains a Bootstrap theme, I hope this is a pleasant experience and my overall opinion of JSF improves.

Shortly after the AppFuse 2.2.1 release in December, Gilberto Andrade contributed a sample project that used Mojarra (the JSF RI) and PrimeFaces instead of MyFaces and its Tomahawk components. Last week, I spent a few hours integrating Gilberto's changes into AppFuse's master branch. You can see all the changes I made (which include a Jetty plugin upgrade and some cleanup) in this Crucible review. Feel free to leave comments on ask questions in the review itself.

The first thing I noticed when integrating PrimeFaces is you have to add a custom repository in order to get its artifacts via Maven.

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>prime-repo</id>
        <name>Prime Repo</name>
        <url>http://repository.primefaces.org</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

This is unfortunate since all of AppFuse's other dependencies can be found in Maven Central. It means that if you're using a JSF archetype, the PrimeFaces repo will be checked for artifacts first, causing an unnecessary slowdown in artifact resolution. I hope the PrimeFaces developers fix this soon.

While integrating these two frameworks, I ran into a number of issues.

An IllegalStateException on startup when using "mvn jetty:run"
The first issue I encountered was that I was unable to run the app in Jetty. It worked fine in Tomcat but I got the following error in Jetty:

2013-01-31 22:28:07.683:WARN:/:unavailable
java.lang.IllegalStateException: Application was not properly initialized at startup, could not find Factory: javax.faces.context.FacesContextFactory
at javax.faces.FactoryFinder$FactoryManager.getFactory(FactoryFinder.java:951)
at javax.faces.FactoryFinder.getFactory(FactoryFinder.java:316)
at javax.faces.webapp.FacesServlet.init(FacesServlet.java:302)
at org.eclipse.jetty.servlet.ServletHolder.initServlet(ServletHolder.java:492)
at org.eclipse.jetty.servlet.ServletHolder.doStart(ServletHolder.java:312)

I found the fix for this on Stack Overflow and added the following listener to my web.xml to solve it.

<listener>
    <listener-class>com.sun.faces.config.ConfigureListener</listener-class>
</listener>

Conditionally rendering a button disables its click-ability
The next thing I noticed was the Delete button didn't work when editing a user. It was hidden correctly when adding a user, but clicking on it to delete a user simply refreshes the page. Below is the code I used successfully with MyFaces. For some reason, this doesn't work with PrimeFaces.

<c:if test="${not empty userForm.user.id}">
<h:commandButton value="#{text['button.delete']}" action="#{userForm.delete}"
    styleClass="btn" onclick="return confirmMessage(msgDelConfirm)"/>
</c:if>

I also tried the following, but no dice. This is currently an open issue.

<h:commandButton rendered="${not empty userForm.user.id}" value="#{text['button.delete']}" 
    action="#{userForm.delete}" styleClass="btn" onclick="return confirmMessage(msgDelConfirm)"/>

The PrimeFaces Bootstrap theme 404s on some images
After integrating PrimeFaces' Bootstrap theme, the following error shows up in server logs.

[INFO] [talledLocalContainer] Feb 02, 2013 10:40:25 PM com.sun.faces.application.resource.ResourceHandlerImpl logMissingResource
[WARNING] [talledLocalContainer] WARNING: JSF1064: Unable to find or serve resource, images/ui-bg_highlight-hard_70_000000_1x100.png, from library, primefaces-bootstrap.

This seems to have happened before in previous releases and is currently an open issue.

Canoo WebTest doesn't work with fileUpload nor to set checkbox values
We use Canoo WebTest to run integration tests on the UI in AppFuse. For some reason, performing file uploads and setting checkbox values works fine with MyFaces/Tomahawk, but not with Mojarra/PrimeFaces. I'm not sure if this is caused by the JSF core or the component library, but it remains an open issue. For now, I've just commented out the parts of tests that used to do this.

On a related note, getting the real path of a resource from the ServletContext worked fine before the switch, but results in a null value now.

String uploadDir = getServletContext().getRealPath("/resources") + "/" + request.getRemoteUser() + "/";

PrimeFaces resources served up at /javax.faces.resource/* not found
While I didn't have problems with this in AppFuse, I did encounter it in AppFuse Light. I don't know why there was a difference between the two, but it turned out to be caused by the UrlRewriteFilter and my desire for extensionless URLs. The outbound-rule to strip .xhtml from URLs was the culprit. Adding a condition to it solved the problem. Yeah, the condition seems backwards, but it works.

<outbound-rule match-type="regex">
    <condition type="query-string" operator="equal">ln=primefaces</condition>
    <from>^(.*)\.xhtml(\?.*)?$</from>
    <to last="false">$1$2</to>
</outbound-rule>

Summary
The initial switch to Mojarra/PrimeFaces was pretty easy thanks to Gilberto's sample project. However, the small issues encountered after that turned out to be quite frustrating and you can see that several are still not fixed. I guess it just goes to show that not all web frameworks are perfect. Hopefully we'll get these minor issues fixed before the next release. In the meantime, you can checkout the updated demos for AppFuse JSF and AppFuse Light JSF.

Posted in Java at Feb 06 2013, 12:19:34 PM MST Add a Comment

AppFuse 2.1 Released!

The AppFuse Team is pleased to announce the release of AppFuse 2.1. This release includes upgrades to all dependencies to bring them up-to-date with their latest releases. Most notable are JPA 2, JSF 2, Tapestry 5 and Spring 3. In addition, we've migrated from XFire to CXF and enabled REST for web services. There's even a new appfuse-ws archetype that leverages Enunciate to generate web service endpoints, documentation and downloadable clients. This release fixes many issues with archetypes, improving startup time and allowing jetty:run to be used for quick turnaround while developing. For more details on specific changes see the release notes.

What is AppFuse?
AppFuse is an open source project and application that uses open source frameworks to help you develop Web applications with Java quickly and efficiently. It was originally developed to eliminate the ramp-up time when building new web applications. At its core, AppFuse is a project skeleton, similar to the one that's created by your IDE when you click through a wizard to create a new web project. If you use JRebel with IntelliJ, you can achieve zero-turnaround in your project and develop features without restarting the server.

Release Details
Archetypes now include all the source for the web modules so using jetty:run and your IDE will work much smoother now. The backend is still embedded in JARs, enabling you to choose with persistence framework (Hibernate, iBATIS or JPA) you'd like to use. If you want to modify the source for that, add the core classes to your project or run "appfuse:full-source".

AppFuse comes in a number of different flavors. It offers "light", "basic" and "modular" and archetypes. Light archetypes use an embedded H2 database and contain a simple CRUD example. Light archetypes allow code generation and full-source features, but do not currently support Stripes or Wicket. Basic archetypes have web services using CXF, authentication from Spring Security and features including signup, login, file upload and CSS theming. Modular archetypes are similar to basic archetypes, except they have multiple modules which allows you to separate your services from your web project.

AppFuse provides archetypes for JSF, Spring MVC, Struts 2 and Tapestry 5. The light archetypes are available for these frameworks, as well as for Spring MVC + FreeMarker, Stripes and Wicket. You can see demos of these archetypes at http://demo.appfuse.org.

For information on creating a new project, please see the QuickStart Guide.

If you have questions about AppFuse, please read the FAQ or join the user mailing list. If you find any issues, please report them on the mailing list or create an issue in JIRA.

Thanks to everyone for their help contributing patches, writing documentation and participating on the mailing lists.

We greatly appreciate the help from our sponsors, particularly Atlassian, Contegix and JetBrains. Atlassian and Contegix are especially awesome: Atlassian has donated licenses to all its products and Contegix has donated an entire server to the AppFuse project.

Posted in Java at Apr 04 2011, 09:38:05 AM MDT 5 Comments

Upgrading to JSF 2

Last week, I spent a few hours upgrading AppFuse from JSF 1.2 to JSF 2.0. In reality, I upgraded from MyFaces 1.2.7 to 2.0.4, but all JSF implementations should be the same, right? All in all, it was a pretty easy upgrade with a few minor AppFuse-specific things. My goal in upgrading was to do the bare minimum to get things working and to leave integration of JSF 2 features for a later date.

In addition to upgrading MyFaces, I had to upgrade Tomahawk by changing the dependency's artifactId to tomahawk20. I was also able to remove the following listener from my web.xml:

<listener>
    <listener-class>org.apache.myfaces.webapp.StartupServletContextListener</listener-class>
<listener>

After that, I discovered that MyFaces uses a new URI (/javax.faces.resource/) for serving up some of its resource files. I kindly asked Spring Security to ignore these requests by adding the following to my security.xml file.

<intercept-url pattern="/javax.faces.resource/**" filters="none"/>

Since JSF 2 includes Facelets by default, I tried removing Facelets as a dependency. After doing this, I received the following error:

ERROR [308855416@qtp-120902214-7] ViewHandlerWrapper.fillChain(158) | Error instantiation parent Faces ViewHandler
java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: com.sun.facelets.FaceletViewHandler
        at org.codehaus.plexus.classworlds.strategy.SelfFirstStrategy.loadClass(SelfFirstStrategy.java:50)
        at org.codehaus.plexus.classworlds.realm.ClassRealm.loadClass(ClassRealm.java:244)
        at org.codehaus.plexus.classworlds.realm.ClassRealm.loadClass(ClassRealm.java:230)
        at org.mortbay.jetty.webapp.WebAppClassLoader.loadClass(WebAppClassLoader.java:401)
        at org.mortbay.jetty.webapp.WebAppClassLoader.loadClass(WebAppClassLoader.java:363)
        at org.ajax4jsf.framework.ViewHandlerWrapper.fillChain(ViewHandlerWrapper.java:144)
        at org.ajax4jsf.framework.ViewHandlerWrapper.calculateRenderKitId(ViewHandlerWrapper.java:68)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.DefaultRestoreViewSupport.isPostback(DefaultRestoreViewSupport.java:179)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.RestoreViewExecutor.execute(RestoreViewExecutor.java:113)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.LifecycleImpl.executePhase(LifecycleImpl.java:171)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.LifecycleImpl.execute(LifecycleImpl.java:118)
        at javax.faces.webapp.FacesServlet.service(FacesServlet.java:189)

Figuring this was caused by the following element in my web.xml ...

<context-param>
    <param-name>org.ajax4jsf.VIEW_HANDLERS</param-name>
    <param-value>com.sun.facelets.FaceletViewHandler</param-value>
</context-param>

... I removed it and tried again. This time I received a NoClassDefFoundError:

java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: com/sun/facelets/tag/TagHandler
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass1(Native Method)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClassCond(ClassLoader.java:632)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass(ClassLoader.java:616)
        at java.security.SecureClassLoader.defineClass(SecureClassLoader.java:141)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.defineClass(URLClassLoader.java:283)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.access$000(URLClassLoader.java:58)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:197)
        at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(URLClassLoader.java:190)
        at org.mortbay.jetty.webapp.WebAppClassLoader.loadClass(WebAppClassLoader.java:392)
        at org.mortbay.jetty.webapp.WebAppClassLoader.loadClass(WebAppClassLoader.java:363)
        at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
        at java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:247)
        at org.apache.myfaces.shared_impl.util.ClassUtils.classForName(ClassUtils.java:184)
        at org.apache.myfaces.view.facelets.util.ReflectionUtil.forName(ReflectionUtil.java:67)

Since everything seemed to work with Facelets in the classpath, I decided to save this headache for a later date. I entered two issues in AppFuse's JIRA, one for removing Facelets and one for replacing Ajax4JSF with RichFaces.

The next issue I encountered was redirecting from AppFuse's password hint page. The navigation-rule for this page is as follows:

<navigation-rule>
    <from-view-id>/passwordHint.xhtml</from-view-id>
    <navigation-case>
        <from-outcome>success</from-outcome>
        <to-view-id>/login</to-view-id>
        <redirect/>
    </navigation-case>
</navigation-rule>

With JSF 2.0, the rule changes the URL to /login.xhtml when redirecting (where it was left as /login with 1.2) and it was caught by the security setting in my web.xml that prevents users from viewing raw templates.

<security-constraint>
    <web-resource-collection>
        <web-resource-name>Protect XHTML Templates</web-resource-name>
        <url-pattern>*.xhtml</url-pattern>
    </web-resource-collection>
    <auth-constraint/>
</security-constraint>

To solve this issue, I had to make a couple of changes:

  • Comment out the security-constraint in web.xml and move it to Spring Security's security.xml file.
    <intercept-url pattern="/**/*.xhtml" access="ROLE_NOBODY"/>
    
  • Add a rule to urlrewrite.xml that redirects back to login (since login.xhtml doesn't exist and I'm using extensionless URLs).
    <rule match-type="regex">
        <from>^/login.xhtml$</from>
        <to type="redirect">%{context-path}/login</to>
    </rule>
    

After getting the Password Hint feature passing in the browser, I tried running the integration tests (powered by Canoo WebTest). The Password Hint test kept failing with the following error:

[ERROR] /Users/mraible/dev/appfuse/web/jsf/src/test/resources/web-tests.xml:51: JavaScript error loading
page http://localhost:9876/appfuse-jsf-2.1.0-SNAPSHOT/passwordHint?username=admin: syntax error (http://
localhost:9876/appfuse-jsf-2.1.0-SNAPSHOT/javax.faces.resource/oamSubmit.js.jsf?ln=org.apache.myfaces#122)

Figuring this was caused by my hack to submit the form when the page was loaded, I turned to Pretty Faces, which allows you to call a method directly from a URL. After adding the Pretty Faces dependencies to my pom.xml, I created a src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/pretty-config.xml file with the following XML:

<url-mapping>
    <pattern value="/editProfile"/>
    <view-id value="/userForm.jsf"/>
    <action>#{userForm.edit}</action>
</url-mapping>

<url-mapping>
    <pattern value="/passwordHint/#{username}"/>
    <view-id value="/passwordHint.jsf"/>
    <action>#{passwordHint.execute}</action>
</url-mapping>

This allowed me to remove both editProfile.xhtml and passwordHint.xhtml, both of which simply auto-submitted forms.

At this point, I figured I'd be good to go and ran my integration tests again. The first thing I discovered was that ".jsf" was being tacked onto my pretty URL, most likely by the UrlRewriteFilter. Adding the following to my PasswordHint.java class solved this.

if (username.endsWith(".jsf")) {
    username = username.substring(0, username.indexOf(".jsf"));
}

The next thing was a cryptic error that took me a while to figure out.

DEBUG [1152467051@qtp-144702232-0] PasswordHint.execute(38) | Processing Password Hint...
2011-03-05 05:48:52.471:WARN::/passwordHint/admin
com.ocpsoft.pretty.PrettyException: Exception occurred while processing <:#{passwordHint.execute}> null
        at com.ocpsoft.pretty.faces.beans.ActionExecutor.executeActions(ActionExecutor.java:71)
        at com.ocpsoft.pretty.faces.event.PrettyPhaseListener.processEvent(PrettyPhaseListener.java:214)
        at com.ocpsoft.pretty.faces.event.PrettyPhaseListener.afterPhase(PrettyPhaseListener.java:108)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.PhaseListenerManager.informPhaseListenersAfter(PhaseListenerManager.java:111)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.LifecycleImpl.executePhase(LifecycleImpl.java:185)
        at org.apache.myfaces.lifecycle.LifecycleImpl.execute(LifecycleImpl.java:118)
        at javax.faces.webapp.FacesServlet.service(FacesServlet.java:189)

Digging into the bowels of MyFaces, I discovered a class was looking for a viewId with an extension and no view-id was being set. Adding the following to the top of my execute() method solved this.

getFacesContext().getViewRoot().setViewId("/passwordHint.xhtml");

After making this change, all AppFuse's integration tests are passing and the upgrade seems complete. The only other issues I encountered were logging-related. The first is an error about Tomahawk that doesn't seem to affect anything.

Mar 5, 2011 6:44:01 AM com.sun.facelets.compiler.TagLibraryConfig loadImplicit
SEVERE: Error Loading Library: jar:file:/Users/mraible/.m2/repository/org/apache/myfaces/tomahawk/tomahawk20/1.1.10/tomahawk20-1.1.10.jar!/META-INF/tomahawk.taglib.xml
java.io.IOException: Error parsing [jar:file:/Users/mraible/.m2/repository/org/apache/myfaces/tomahawk/tomahawk20/1.1.10/tomahawk20-1.1.10.jar!/META-INF/tomahawk.taglib.xml]: 
        at com.sun.facelets.compiler.TagLibraryConfig.create(TagLibraryConfig.java:410)
        at com.sun.facelets.compiler.TagLibraryConfig.loadImplicit(TagLibraryConfig.java:431)
        at com.sun.facelets.compiler.Compiler.initialize(Compiler.java:87)
        at com.sun.facelets.compiler.Compiler.compile(Compiler.java:104)

The second is excessive logging from MyFaces. As far as I can tell, this is because MyFaces switched to java.util.logging instead of commons logging. With all the frameworks that AppFuse leverages, I think it has all the logging frameworks in its classpath now. I was hoping to fix this by posting a message to the mailing list, but haven't received a reply yet.

[WARNING] [talledLocalContainer] Mar 5, 2011 6:50:25 AM org.apache.myfaces.config.annotation.TomcatAnnotationLifecycleProvider newInstance
[WARNING] [talledLocalContainer] INFO: Creating instance of org.appfuse.webapp.action.BasePage
[WARNING] [talledLocalContainer] Mar 5, 2011 6:50:25 AM org.apache.myfaces.config.annotation.TomcatAnnotationLifecycleProvider destroyInstance
[WARNING] [talledLocalContainer] INFO: Destroy instance of org.appfuse.webapp.action.BasePage

After successfully upgrading AppFuse, I turned to AppFuse Light, where things were much easier.

Now that AppFuse uses JSF 2, I hope to start leveraging some of its new features. If you're yearning to get started with them today, I invite you to grab the source and start integrating them yourself.

Posted in Java at Mar 07 2011, 01:24:53 PM MST 3 Comments

AppFuse 2.1 Milestone 2 Released

I'm pleased to announce the 2nd milestone release of AppFuse 2.1. This release includes upgrades to all dependencies to bring them up-to-date with their latest releases. Most notable are Spring 3 and Struts 2.1. This release fixes many issues with archetypes and contains many improvements to support Maven 3. For more details on specific changes see the 2.1.0 M2 release notes.

What is AppFuse?
AppFuse is an open source project and application that uses open source frameworks to help you develop Web applications quickly and efficiently. It was originally developed to eliminate the ramp-up time when building new web applications. At its core, AppFuse is a project skeleton, similar to the one that's created by your IDE when you click through a wizard to create a new web project. If you use JRebel with AppFuse, you can achieve zero-turnaround in your project and develop features without restarting the server.

Release Details
Archetypes now include all the source for the web modules so using jetty:run and your IDE will work much smoother now. The backend is still embedded in JARs, enabling you to choose with persistence framework (Hibernate, iBATIS or JPA) you'd like to use. If you want to modify the source for that, add the core classes to your project or run "appfuse:full-source".

AppFuse comes in a number of different flavors. It offers "light", "basic" and "modular" and archetypes. Light archetypes use an embedded H2 database and contain a simple CRUD example. In the final 2.1.0 release, the light archetypes will allow code generation like the basic and modular archetypes. Basic archetypes have web services using CXF, authentication from Spring Security and features including signup, login, file upload and CSS theming. Modular archetypes are similar to basic archetypes, except they have multiple modules which allows you to separate your services from your web project.

AppFuse provides archetypes for JSF, Spring MVC, Struts 2 and Tapestry 5. The light archetypes are available for these frameworks, as well as for Spring MVC + FreeMarker, Stripes and Wicket.

Please note that this release does not contain updates to the documentation. Code generation will work, but it's likely that some content in the tutorials won't match. For example, you can use annotations (vs. XML) for Spring MVC and Tapestry is a whole new framework. I'll be working on documentation over the next several weeks in preparation for the 2.1 final release.

For information on creating a new project, please see the QuickStart Guide.

If you have questions about AppFuse, please read the FAQ or join the user mailing list. If you find bugs, please create an issue in JIRA.

Thanks to everyone for their help contributing patches, writing documentation and participating on the mailing lists.

Posted in Java at Nov 15 2010, 03:28:57 PM MST 2 Comments

AppFuse 2.1 Milestone 1 Released

The AppFuse Team is pleased to announce the first milestone release of AppFuse 2.1. This release includes upgrades to all dependencies to bring them up-to-date with their latest releases. Most notable are Hibernate, Spring and Tapestry 5.

What is AppFuse?
AppFuse is an open source project and application that uses open source tools built on the Java platform to help you develop Web applications quickly and efficiently. It was originally developed to eliminate the ramp-up time found when building new web applications for customers. At its core, AppFuse is a project skeleton, similar to the one that's created by your IDE when you click through a wizard to create a new web project.

Release Details
Archetypes now include all the source for the web modules so using jetty:run and your IDE will work much smoother now. The backend is still embedded in JARs, enabling you to choose which persistence framework (Hibernate, iBATIS or JPA) you'd like to use. If you want to modify the source for that, add the core classes to your project or run appfuse:full-source.

In addition, AppFuse Light has been converted to Maven and has archetypes available. AppFuse provides archetypes for JSF, Spring MVC, Struts 2 and Tapestry 5. The light archetypes are available for these frameworks, as well as for Spring MVC + FreeMarker, Stripes and Wicket.

Other notable improvements:

Please note that this release does not contain updates to the documentation. Code generation will work, but it's likely that some content in the tutorials won't match. For example, you can use annotations (vs. XML) for dependency injection and Tapestry is a whole new framework. I'll be working on documentation over the next several weeks in preparation for Milestone 2.

AppFuse is available as several Maven archetypes. For information on creating a new project, please see the QuickStart Guide.

To learn more about AppFuse, please read Ryan Withers' Igniting your applications with AppFuse.

The 2.x series of AppFuse has a minimum requirement of the following specification versions:

  • Java Servlet 2.4 and JSP 2.0 (2.1 for JSF)
  • Java 5+

If you have questions about AppFuse, please read the FAQ or join the user mailing list. If you find bugs, please create an issue in JIRA.

Thanks to everyone for their help contributing code, writing documentation, posting to the mailing lists, and logging issues.

Posted in Java at Nov 19 2009, 07:16:36 AM MST 8 Comments

AppFuse 2.0.2 Released

The AppFuse Team is pleased to announce the release of AppFuse 2.0.2. This release includes upgrades to Spring Security 2.0, jMock 2.4, the ability to customize code generation templates and many bug fixes.

For information on upgrading from 2.0.1, see the Release Notes or changelog. AppFuse 2.0.2 is available as a Maven archetype. For information on creating a new project using AppFuse, please see the QuickStart Guide or the demos and videos.

To learn more about AppFuse, please read Ryan Withers' Igniting your applications with AppFuse.

The 2.0 series of AppFuse has a minimum requirement of the following specification versions:

  • Java Servlet 2.4 and JSP 2.0 (2.1 for JSF)
  • Java 5+

If you've used AppFuse 1.x, but not 2.x, you'll want to read the FAQ. Join the user mailing list if you have any questions.

Thanks to everyone for their help contributing code, writing documentation, posting to the mailing lists, and logging issues.

Please post any issues you have with this release to the mailing list.

Posted in Java at May 11 2008, 11:25:40 PM MDT 4 Comments

AppFuse Light 1.8.2 Released

AppFuse Light 1.8.2 is a bug fixes release that includes upgrades for Spring, Spring Security, Hibernate, Wicket, Tapestry and many others. In addition, Spring bean definitions were replaced with annotations (@Repository, @Service and @Controller). See the Release Notes for more information on what's changed since the last release.

AppFuse Light now offers 60 possible combinations for download:

  • Web Frameworks: JSF (MyFaces), Spring MVC (with Ajax, Acegi Security, JSP, FreeMarker or Velocity), Stripes, Struts 1.x, Struts 2.x, Tapestry, WebWork, Wicket
  • Persistence Frameworks: Hibernate, iBATIS, JDO (JPOX), OJB, Spring JDBC

AppFuse Light Screenshot - click on the box at the bottom right of AL to activate StyleSheet Switcher

If you have any questions about this release, please subscribe to the AppFuse user mailing list by sending a blank e-mail to users-subscribe@appfuse.dev.java.net. You can also post questions in a forum-like fashion using Nabble: http://appfuse.org/forum/user.

Posted in Java at May 11 2008, 10:16:17 PM MDT Add a Comment

AppFuse Light 1.8.1 Released: includes upgrades to Spring 2.5 and Wicket 1.3

AppFuse Light 1.8.1 is a bug fixes release that includes an upgrade to Spring 2.5 and Wicket 1.3 RC1. See the Release Notes for more information on what's changed since the last release.

What is AppFuse Light? Click here to find out.

AppFuse Light now offers 60 possible combinations for download:

  • Web Frameworks: JSF (MyFaces), Spring MVC (with Ajax, Acegi Security, JSP, FreeMarker or Velocity), Stripes, Struts 1.x, Struts 2.x, Tapestry, WebWork, Wicket
  • Persistence Frameworks: Hibernate, iBATIS, JDO (JPOX), OJB, Spring JDBC

AppFuse Light Screenshot - click on the box at the bottom right of AL to activate StyleSheet Switcher

If you have any questions about this release, please subscribe to the AppFuse user mailing list by sending a blank e-mail to users-subscribe@appfuse.dev.java.net. You can also post questions in a forum-like fashion using Nabble: http://appfuse.org/forum/user.

If you're a developer of one of the frameworks that AppFuse Light uses - I'd love a code review to make sure I'm "up to snuff" on how to use your framework. I'm also more than willing to give commit rights if you'd like to improve the implementation of your framework.

Live demos are available at:

What's on tap for AppFuse Light 2.0? Here's what I'm hoping to do:

  1. Drop the seldom-used persistence frameworks: JDBC, JDO and OJB.
  2. Drop Struts 1.x and WebWork as web frameworks (replaced by Struts 2).
  3. Support the same persistence frameworks as AppFuse: Hibernate, iBATIS and JPA.
  4. Re-use appfuse-service, appfuse-hibernate, appfuse-ibatis and appfuse-jpa in AppFuse Light. I'll likely include the core classes (User, Role) since AppFuse Light is more "raw" than AppFuse.
  5. Require Java 5.

Let me know if you disagree with any of these items or would like to see other enhancements.

Posted in Java at Nov 29 2007, 09:28:06 AM MST 3 Comments

AppFuse 2.0.1 Released

The AppFuse Team is pleased to announce the release of AppFuse 2.0.1. This release squashes a number of bugs and includes an upgrade to Spring 2.5. To learn more about Spring 2.5's features, see InfoQ's What's New in Spring 2.5: Part 1 article.

For information on upgrading from 2.0, see the 2.0.1 Release Notes or changelog. AppFuse 2.0.1 is available as a Maven archetype. For information on creating a new project using AppFuse, please see the QuickStart Guide or the demos and videos.

What is AppFuse? Click here to find out.

The 2.0 series of AppFuse has a minimum requirement of the following specification versions:

  • Java Servlet 2.4 and JSP 2.0 (2.1 for JSF)
  • Java 5+

If you've used AppFuse 1.x, but not 2.x, you'll want to read the FAQ. Join the user mailing list if you have any questions.

Thanks to everyone for their help contributing code, writing documentation, posting to the mailing lists, and logging issues.

We greatly appreciate the help from our sponsors, particularly Atlassian, Contegix, JetBrains, and Java.net. Atlassian and Contegix are especially awesome: Atlassian has donated licenses to all its products and Contegix has donated an entire server to the AppFuse project. Thanks guys - you rock!

Please post any issues you have with this release to the mailing list.

Posted in Java at Nov 26 2007, 09:29:43 AM MST 4 Comments

AppFuse 2.0 Released!

I'm extremely happy to announce we've finally finished developing AppFuse 2.0. The road to AppFuse 2.0 has been a long journey through Mavenland, annotations and generics. Thanks to all the developers, contributors and users for helping test, polish and prove that AppFuse 2 is an excellent solution for developing Java-based applications. Your time, patience and usage of AppFuse has made it the strong foundation it is today. Last but certainly not least, thanks to all the great Java developers who wrote the frameworks that AppFuse uses - we're truly standing on the shoulders of giants.

What is AppFuse? Click here to find out.

AppFuse 2.0 is available as a Maven archetype. For information on creating a new project using this release, please see the QuickStart Guide or the demos and videos.

If you've used AppFuse 1.x, but not 2.x, you'll might want to read our Frequently Asked Questions. If you have any questions or issues, please post them to the user mailing list. The Maven Reference Guide has a map of Ant » Maven commands. Maven for Newbies might also be useful if you've never used Maven before. There is some support for Ant in this release.

AppFuse 2.0 contains over 200 pages of documentation, downloadable as a PDF (3 MB). You can also download all its dependencies and install them in your local repository if you want to work offline.

For more information, please see the 2.0 Release Notes. The 2.0 series of AppFuse has a minimum requirement of the following specification versions:

  • Java Servlet 2.4 and JSP 2.0 (2.1 for JSF)
  • Java 5+

New features in AppFuse 2.0 include:

  • Maven 2 Integration
  • Upgraded WebWork to Struts 2
  • JDK 5, Annotations, JSP 2.0, Servlet 2.4
  • JPA Support
  • Generic CRUD backend
  • Full Eclipse, IDEA and NetBeans support
  • Fast startup and no deploy with Maven Jetty Plugin
  • Testable on multiple appservers and databases with Cargo and profiles

We appreciate the time and effort everyone has put toward contributing code and documentation, posting to the mailing lists, and logging issues.

We're also grateful for the help from our sponsors, particularly Atlassian, Contegix, JetBrains, and Java.net. Atlassian and Contegix are especially awesome: Atlassian has donated licenses to all its products and Contegix has donated an entire server to the AppFuse project. Thanks guys - you rock!

Comments and issues should be posted to the mailing list.

Posted in Java at Sep 18 2007, 03:22:20 PM MDT 7 Comments